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Instructions for Hooking

Definition

Traditional hooking is the process of making continuous loops with strips of tightly woven fabric and packing them tightly to form an even pile on a foundation material.  The work is done on the right side, using a tool called a hook, best described as a crochet hook with a handle.

How to Hook

image Stretch foundation fabric on a frame or hoop, design side up, keeping taut.

Sit comfortably, resting frame on table or lap.

With left hand, hold end of wool strand between thumb and forefinger.

With right hand, hold hook as pencil with fingertips on the metal collar.

With left hand beneath foundation, push hook through weave, catching wool.

Guiding hook and strip with left thumb, pull end of strip through weave to height of 1/2”.

Push hook into next weave, catching wool and pulling to form loop 1/8” to 3/16” high, pulling loop back toward previous loop to prevent pulling out.

Working from right to left, make even loops which touch each other so that the foundation fabric is not visible.  You will need to skip some rows or holes in the weave so that your hooking does not buckle (when wool is packed too tightly your piece will roll).

At end of strip, pull end through weave.  All ends should be pulled to surface throughout looping process.  Tails on back are easily pulled out.

Start second strip in same weave in which previous loop ended and again end on the surface.

Trim ends even with loops after completing a section.

Continue looping process until pattern is complete.

Do not cross a row of hooking with another row on the back as it creates lumps.